Barcelona: Sagrada Família

Many tourists from all over the world flock to see this landmark. The buzz around it is incredible, and of course the money perks of charging 16-17 euros to every person who wants to get inside can’t be bad for tourism profits.

This very large Roman Catholic church, designed by Spanish architect Antoni Gaudí is a UNESCO World Heritage site, even though it isn’t even finished yet!

Construction of Sagrada Familia began in 1882. In 1926, by the time that Gaudi died at age 73, less than a quarter of the project was complete.

Gaudí devoted his last years to the project. It is absolutely beautiful and the detail is breathtaking.

Every single piece is carefully crafted. So much detail that you could gaze and notice different shapes for days. Gaudi took inspiration from the Vatican in Rome, which I’ve  also been lucky enough to visit and you can definitely tell because of the style and detail of even just the outside of the church.
Being my impatient self I couldn’t be bothered with the queues, but seeing the beauty of just the outside was more than enough.

The towers and most of the church’s structure are to be completed by 2026, the centennial of Gaudí’s death, and the decorative elements should be complete by 2030 or 2032. Making it an architectural masterpiece that will take 150 years!

Can’t wait for that grand opening!

 

 

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Koh Samui in the rain

All we’ve done in Koh Samui the past couple of days is witness Thailands tropical thunderstorms at its finest. Our second day consisted of table tennis and pool at our hotel, with the odd run out to get food. To be honest it was perfect as we was all hungover after our 6am Samui turn out the night before. Ark bar was a great shout, and Samuis Ko Sahn Road.

Here’s some pics of the night: 

   

   
  
   

  

 
  
Yesterday we decided not to let the rain defeat us and went on a 12km walk down the East coast of Samui to find ‘Hinyai and Hintai'(Grandfather and Grandmother rock). Named as this,I assume, simply because one formation looks like a giant penis, and the other like a vagina.

  

I have to say after trekking for 2 hours the result was quite disppointing.. 

Can you see the vagina?

 On the plus side we see 4 different beaches and lots of boats.

   
  I got in some good exercise and I feel ok today so I don’t think I caught pneumonia either. Oh and I found another swing.Winning. 

  
We’ve woke up this morning to sunshine, hurrah! We’ve just arrived at our beach resort in Koh Panghan for Christmas. And it’s beautiful! 

Merry Christmas Eve everyone 

LwL x 

Bangkok Sightseeing: All Things Gold. 

First (and third) tuk tuk stop

The Giant Buddha

The 32-meter (100-foot) tall standing Buddha of Wat Indrawiharn used to be visible from just about any high vantage point around the old city. Now it’s hidden behind the new buildings from Thailand’s boom years of the 1980s and 90s.

       
 On route, a tropical rainstorm struck and when we got to the giant Buddha we could barely see it, let alone ourselves, so we got back into the tuk tuk (still getting very wet but hey it’s all part of the experience) and headed to the official government information centre. We was going to go home but our driver Sarpong told us that he gets a free meal if he takes us so of course we decided to go.

  
Government Information Centre

Now this is a place I would highly recommend for some information. We actually ended up booking the whole next month of our trip here. Covering all islands, travel and activities all the way up to Christmas where we’ll be in Koh Panghan. It was great and they were so helpful!   

The rain had finally stopped so back to the Golden Buddha we went..

   

   

    
  
  
Last but not least we headed to my favourite of the day..
The Gold Mount (Wat Saket)

Wat Saket Ratcha Wora Maha Wihan(Thai: วัดสระเกศราชวรมหาวิหาร, usually shortened to Wat Saket (rtgs: Wat Sa Ket)) is a Buddhist temple (Wat) in Pom Prap Sattru Phai district, Bangkok, Thailand.

  344 steps to reach the top and a cost of 20 baht – well worth the 40p!

  
  The temple dates back to the Ayutthaya era, when it was known as Wat Sakae. When Bangkok became the capital, King Rama I renovated the temple and gave it its present name.

  
  

  

Three different Kings were involved in the completion of this structure overall, making it the most important landmark in the whole of Thailand. 

  
 
  
Have you been Bangkok before? What was your favourite landmark?

LwL x